Economic Justice

In recent years we have strengthened our focus on economic justice issues as a result of workplace injustices we uncovered. Workplace discrimination issues disproportionately affect immigrant workers for a number of reasons. Language barriers, poverty and lack of awareness of their rights, and fear of retaliation often prevent them from seeking legal assistance or contacting governmental labor and law enforcement authorities. The scarcity of legal resources in high poverty areas and limitations on federally-funded legal service providers seriously complicate matters for undocumented immigrants. Of the few legal service providers that serve all immigrant workers regardless of status, none focus exclusively on Latinos, and few serve the geographic areas we work in.

Too often, the institutions that are supposed to benefit workers instead work against them. Recent immigrants often rely on local employment agencies that charge fees and largely control access to low-wage jobs, such as domestic and restaurant work. Employment agencies often take advantage of and defraud workers by charging exorbitant advance fees for unfulfilled services, knowingly place workers in jobs that violate state and federal labor laws, fail to pay minimum wage or overtime, and threaten to blacklist workers who complain. Domestic workers often rely on referral agencies to access per diem jobs that barely pay a poverty wage. Restaurant workers have been known to use these agencies only to find themselves working 70+ hours without earning minimum wage or overtime.

Programs

Latinas at Work

The purpose of the Latinas At Work Project is to challenge the systemic abuse of immigrant women workers in the metropolitan New York area. The exploitation of Latina immigrant workers is a serious and pervasive problem throughout the country. From factories, hotels, restaurants and other small businesses to private homes, workers are routinely subjected to exploitative labor conditions with long hours, illegally low wages and sexual harassment. The Latinas At Work Project seeks to challenge the systemic abuse of immigrant women workers. Read the full description of the program here.

Puerto Rico Debt Crisis

The burdens of the Puerto Rican Debt crisis are being shouldered disproportionately by the people in Puerto Rico. In an effort to shift this imbalance, we are working with activists in Puerto Rico and the United States to make sure that solutions developed respect the rights of the people in Puerto Rico more than the banks. You can read about a FOIA we filed for information concerning the federal fiscal control board established under the Puerto Rico Oversight, Management, and Economic Stability Act (PROMESA) here.

Economic Justice Legislation

LatinoJustice follows a number of laws at the local and national level about Economic Justice. Check back here regularly for updates on specific laws that hurt or benefit the community. The featured Economic Justice Legislation will be updated on a monthly basis. The first piece of legislation that we want to highlight is our testimony before the New York City Council on the Street Vendor Bill, you can read the testimony here.

Economic Justice Updates

Mayor’s Proposal to Address Diversity in NYC’s Specialized High School Admissions Is Too Little Too Late

New York, NY - LatinoJustice PRLDEF, The NAACP Legal Defense Fund, and the Center for Law & Social Justice at Medgar Evers College are deeply concerned about New York City’s lack of significant progress and commitment to educational reform of its admissions policies for the City’s specialized high schools. The Mayor’s recently announced reforms are a good start but the reforms may be “too little too late”. Four consecutive years of admissions data under this administration paint a dismal picture of narrowing equal opportunity, and again raises questions as to why so few Latinx and Black public school students are being accepted into NYC’s eight specialized high schools.

LatinoJustice Applauds the NYC Bar Associations Support for Exempting Puerto Rico from the Jones Act

LatinoJustice PRLDEF applauds the call of the New York City Bar Association for a permanent exemption for Puerto Rico from the crippling effects of the antiquated, maritime requirements of the Jones Act which exacts a high price for food, goods, energy, and equipment shipped to the island

KOREAN AND LATINO WORKERS AT KOREAN RESTAURANT IN NYC WIN ENFORCEMENT OF WAGE THEFT JUDGMENT OF $2.7 MILLION

::New York, NY:: A Manhattan federal court ruled on Wednesday, April 18, 2018, that the owner of the Kum Gang San restaurants, Ji Sung Yoo, fraudulently transferred his property to his wife in order to avoid paying a wage theft judgment of $2.7 million to 11 Asian and Latino workers.

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